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The widow of Haitian President says a civil rights activist wants to kill her

President Jovenel Moïse’s widow has accused opponents of the Haitian president of plotting his assassination, while prosecutors have summoned business and political leaders for questioning.

Martine Moïse, who suffered a serious injury last week, speaks in Creole from Florida, where she is receiving medical treatment.

“He sent troops to kill the President at his home and his relatives because of roads, water, electricity and the referendum and by-elections at the end of the year so that there would be no change in the country,” he said. an audio message posted on his Twitter account on Saturday.

Investigators are questioning members of the president’s security forces, who were not harmed when a group of 28 people, mostly Colombian Colonel, stormed a Moïse government building outside Port-au-Prince early Wednesday morning and fired 12 shots at a 53-year-old leader.

The killings have threatened to occupy Haiti, the poorest country in the United States, as politicians, wealthy business leaders and lawmakers are battling violence and food and oil shortages.

Prime Minister Claude Joseph has been pushing for more power, and has asked for more UN and US troops to help control the process. Opposition political leaders on Friday elected their caretaker leader, Senate President Joseph Lambert, and ordered the caretaker Prime Minister to resign, saying he was innocent.

Unrest has been raging since Moïse’s death in connection with the election of a caretaker leader. Two types of legislation, following a change that took place in 2012, are proving controversial and the Supreme Court, which could be its successor, died of coronavirus last month. So far, only 10 elected officials have remained in the country, all cinemas, according to which all mayors and councilors have resigned last year without new elections.

International governments fear participation in Haiti, which has been difficult to stabilize and grow after decades of political upheaval and natural disasters. The 11m Caribbean island relies heavily on remittances from Haiti from abroad and international aid.

Bed-Ford Claude, a state attorney in Port-au-Prince, has ordered five prominent Haitians to appear Monday morning for questioning, reports Le Nouvelliste newspaper. Among them were Reginald Boulos, a opposition and business leader, and Steven Benoit, a former cinematographer and presidential candidate.

Boulos offered interview Wednesday condemned the assassination and denial of responsibility, saying: “I don’t think the protesters today can do systematic work.”

Prior to his death, Moïse had said that he was fighting with his political opponents and local business leaders when he tried to clean up government contracts. However, the late President also accused him of fraud, embezzling millions from oil grants in Venezuela. He denied this.

There are growing fears that Haiti’s powerful terrorists are crowding the streets in the absence of a working government.

Former police chief Jimmy “Barbecue” Cherizier, one of the country’s most powerful terrorist commanders, has accused police and protesting politicians of plotting with “stinking governors” to assassinate Moïse and calling for “official violence” to force local tycoons to reclaim the country.

Cherizier was approved by US Treasure last year for allegedly plotting a massacre in the city of 2018 in which at least 71 people were killed while more than 400 homes were destroyed. The bodies of the victims were dragged into the streets, cremated, mutilated and given to livestock, Treasure said.

“It was a national and international coup against the people of Haiti,” Cherizier said in a video on Saturday, wearing khaki uniforms and sitting in front of the Haitian flag. “We urge all agencies to encourage, mobilize and take to the streets to shed light on the assassination of the President.”


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