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10 Dungeons And Dragons Memes That Perfectly Sum Up Playing A Paladin

With Dungeons & Dragons: Honor Among Thieves scheduled for release on March 3, 2023, the tabletop roleplaying game has begun to resurface in popular culture. More people are picking up character sheets and setting off on adventures with their friends across endless fantasy worlds.

Yet one group of players often finds themselves overlooked. People who roll a character who happens to be a Paladin fail to get the attention that their Wizard or Bard counterparts often do. After all, how many players really pay much notice to the holy warrior? Yet Paladins are an incredibly fun class, and some players have been making memes that explore what they’re really like to play.

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Always The Good Guy

With so many players causing chaos in the various towns and holdfasts that parties come across, someone needs to be the responsible one, and that role often falls to the Paladin. While they aren’t always the flashiest characters, they tend to be very helpful at calming crowds when inevitable problems erupt.

So, when the city’s on fire thanks to the Rogue stealing from the wrong nobleman, the Paladin has to get them out when all else fails. It doesn’t always work, but their stout and patient presence certainly helps. At least, when the Paladin isn’t also getting involved in the chaos.

Strong And Proud

There are some overpowered subclasses in D&Dbut none manage to overtake the strength of a Paladin after they’ve decided to take down an enemy after rolling a 20. Paladins can choose to wait until after rolling the hit dice to determine if they actually want to use smite, so they have full knowledge of a critical hit before launching into an all-out attack.

Considering most characters can’t decide to lay down the heavy arms after already earning a rolled 20, it’s a feature that sets the class apart and makes them a dangerous threat on the battlefield. After all, it’s handing a Paladin a bazooka and watching the devastation ensue.

Diplomacy Never Lasts

While it might be unpopular to make dark Paladins in D&D, the Oath of Vengeance gives Paladins the option to take on a brutal task and declare vengeance on all who oppose the will of their gods. These Paladins set off into battle after swearing to take down the greater evil and spare no foe.

It’s a brutal subclass that often breeds hard characters that want nothing more than to see their will spread across the realm. Often darker than what most people would imagine Paladins could be, they prove that no class is really restricted to act in any one way — not even a class sworn to protect the weak.


Don’t Always Go As Planned

It isn’t uncommon for character builds to fail to match the reality of the character that shows up at the table. For Paladins, it’s pretty common for players to sacrifice the Lawful Good traits by the end of the first session. After all, surrounded by murder hobos, it’s hard not to stretch morality if players want to justify them sticking around the party.

Of course, that also means players look a lot more like an evil Superman than anything else. They may seem like heroes on the surface, but one look at them on the battlefield proves that they aren’t exactly forced into doing good by their oaths, which is often dangerous for onlookers.


Checking On The Party

Of course, not every Paladin is dark or cruel. Many follow their oaths well and seek nothing more than to protect the people and serve their gods. Unfortunately, their party members are not often bound by the same tenets, which can sometimes mean Paladins return to find the group in shambles.

While new Dungeon Masters may need tips to deal with their parties, new Paladins also often need to learn how to handle the sheer volume of problems their party delivers to them. It can be a struggle and a half, but most are fairly adept at calming down the situation where possible, even if it initially comes as an absolute shock.

A Multi-Class In Itself

Whereas Fighters tend to face their problems without powers and with mere swords and shields, Clerics rely on the blessings of gods by using spells and divine intervention to ensure their survival. Paladins aren’t quite that limited. Instead, they use both as needed and as wanted.

Whereas Clerics and Fighters can have some pretty underwhelming D&D subclasses, Paladins are almost always engaging characters who can take on any foe with a smile and a righteous fist. They take the best parts of both classes, combine them, and charge into battle as only a godly fighter can.

Don’t Always Need A Tragic Backstory

Though D&D players tend to fall under the impression that they need tragic backstories to get by, many Paladins actually subvert that trope entirely. By carefully selecting the Paladin class, specific races, and the right oath, the characters can still have an interesting story without devolving entirely into edginess.

It helps to ensure that players can have fun with the character without having to worry about them being overly dramatic or boring to other players. Besides, it can also help to have a guiding light in the party who doesn’t have evil family members coming out of the woodwork to kill the gang.

The Easy Way

Clerics have a much harder journey to godliness than Paladins do. After all, Clerics need to ensure that they know their gods well by studying both magic and their god’s history. All the while, Paladins just swear an oath and find themselves blessed with superhuman divine abilities. Definitely the better trade.

Of course, both classes are incredibly fun and can provide some huge support to their party. Still, it’s hard to imagine wanting to go the much harder route to claim powers, rather than just sliding through life as a noble Paladin.

Can’t Be Heroes All The Time

Paladins are expected to be virtuous people willing to put aside their personal feelings to ensure that the people are safe and secure, as is the will of their gods. It doesn’t always work out that way though. Much like how not every Warlock is evil, some Paladins can be genuine problems.

Everyone should try an Oath of Conquest Paladin subclass once just to see what it can really feel like to set out as a cruel Paladin. Though it isn’t likely to function perfectly well in a Lawful Good gang, they tend to be great additions to parties that have a different goal in mind — or at least a separate moral compass.

Don’t Worry About Details

Of course, though they’re intended to be a religious class, not every Paladin is actually very knowledgeable in the will of the gods. Or much about them at all. After all, there isn’t actually a test to determine if a character can be a Paladin or not. Most are simply recipients of a god’s will and nothing more.

So, while players may look to their resident Paladin for guidance, it isn’t always the wisest move. After all, the party Clerics can know a lot more about the history or desires of the gods. All a Paladin needs is a sword, a shield, some armor, and an oath.

Next: 10 Funniest D&D Memes Only DMs Can Relate To


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